Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine

Title abbreviation: Adv Clin Exp Med
JCR Impact Factor (IF) – 1.727
Index Copernicus  – 166.39
MEiN – 70 pts

ISSN 1899–5276 (print)
ISSN 2451-2680 (online)
Periodicity – monthly

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Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine

2016, vol. 25, nr 6, November-December, p. 1273–1279

doi: 10.17219/acem/63824

Publication type: original article

Language: English

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Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells by a Combination of Immunomagnetic Enrichment and RT-PCR in Colorectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgery

Gabriela Vojtechova1,B,D, Lucie Benesova2,A,C,D,E, Barbora Belsanova2,B,C, Petra Minarikova1,B,C, Miroslav Levy3,B,C, Ludmila Lipska3,B,C, Stepan Suchanek1,B,C, Miroslav Zavoral1,C,E, Marek Minarik4,A,C,E,F

1 Internal Clinic, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and Central Military Hospital, Czech Republic

2 Center for Applied Genomics of Solid Tumors (CEGES), Genomac Research Institute, Czech Republic

3 Department of Surgery, 1st Faculty of Medicine Charles University and Thomayer Hospital, Czech Republic

4 Center for Applied Genomics of Solid Tumors (CEGES), Genomac Research Institute, Internal Clinic,

Abstract

Background. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) has been reported in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Monitoring CTC (also known as a liquid-biopsy) has recently become the center of interest for low-invasive monitoring of cancer progression and predictive biomarkers testing. Along with high-cost technology and a complex methodology, a straightforward method based on magnetic beads enrichment followed by RT-PCR is set to allow for routine CTC analysis in colorectal cancer patients.
Objectives. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of CTC detection in routine monitoring of patients starting before and continuing after surgery.
Material and Methods. The investigated group consisted of 30 patients mainly in advanced stages of colorectal cancer. In all patients, CTC detection was performed prior to surgery, in a subset of 14 patients additional sampling was done during and after surgery. In all cases, peripheral blood was processed using AdnaTest ColonCancer kit, which relies on enriching CTCs using EpCAM-functionalized magnetic beads and subsequently identifying tumorspecific CEA, EGFR and GA733-2 mRNA transcripts.
Results. Out of all the tested samples, CTC were found in one patient suffering from advanced disease with lung and liver metastases. There, however, the positive finding was confirmed in 3 consecutive samples acquired before, during and shortly after palliative R2 resection.
Conclusion. The presence of CTC may be used to observe post-operative disease development. Due to the overall low CTC detection, further technology development may be necessary before its universal applicability to manage colorectal cancer patients.

Key words

CTC, colorectal cancer, CEA, EGFR, GA733-2

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